How did a Turkish leader’s death influence the Brexit vote?

Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is a strong supporter of a “no” vote in the EU’s Brexit referendum and has blamed Britain for his downfall.

“We are not going to leave the European Union,” Mr Erdogan told the BBC on Friday.

“And so, you know, if we want to stay, if you are not willing to take this step, I’m not going.” “

The president has repeatedly accused the UK of backing a coup against him in Turkey and has vowed to retaliate with “more violence”. “

And so, you know, if we want to stay, if you are not willing to take this step, I’m not going.”

The president has repeatedly accused the UK of backing a coup against him in Turkey and has vowed to retaliate with “more violence”.

The UK Foreign Office has confirmed it had received a “request from the Turkish Foreign Ministry to respond to a complaint by the UK in relation to the referendum”.

Mr Erdogan said Mr Cameron had not responded to the complaint and “no official response” had been issued.

“But I think that if you ask anyone in Britain, we will retaliate,” Mr Putin told the ABC.

“I am sure we will have more and more violence.”

The Russian leader, who has ruled Turkey since 1999, has accused the British of being a “hostile” force in the Middle East.

The UK has been one of his main allies in the region, which is facing a surge of migrants.

Mr Erdogan has also been vocal about his support for Mr Corbyn, who he described as a “strong man” and a “leader of the opposition”.

“I have the feeling that the British are against this decision,” he told Sky News.

It’s not a decision that should be taken by anyone in this country, it’s a decision of the government.” “

What are they against?

It’s not a decision that should be taken by anyone in this country, it’s a decision of the government.”

A referendum is set to take place in Britain on June 23.

It is the first time that a British national has won a major foreign policy decision by a majority vote, according to a Reuters poll.

The poll of 1,000 voters showed that 52 per cent of those questioned backed a vote for Mr Erdogan.

Mr Putin has accused Mr Cameron of wanting to keep the UK from leaving the EU and that he should step down as prime minister to be replaced by his “good friend” Mr Corbyn.

“If the British government is not willing and able to make a decision about a referendum, I will step down,” Mr Cameron said in an interview on the BBC.

“The referendum is the final word.”

Mr Cameron was widely expected to win the June 23 vote, which will be seen as a referendum on Britain’s future relationship with the EU.

The vote is the most important foreign policy test since the end of the Cold War.

The outcome of the referendum could have a huge impact on the wider region, with the UK and Russia competing over oil and gas supplies and defence.