Election is underway, but not yet over, in Australia

Election is currently underway in Australia, but the political divide over who wins the race for the nation’s top job is already well established.

The election will decide the fate of Prime Minister Kevin Rudd and his government as well as the prime ministers role in forming a new Government after the next election.

In recent days, a series of political pundits have been predicting that Rudd could be the victor and he is expected to win.

However, it is clear that the political division is not as clear cut as many commentators have been claiming.

One commentator has suggested that Labor will be able to win the election despite losing the support of the Greens, who are seen as an anti-Rudd force.

Another commentator has claimed that Rudd’s campaign will not only win the leadership of Labor, but will also be able do so without the support and influence of the Liberals.

All of this has prompted the ABC’s election commentator and former prime minister, Mark Colvin, to say on Sunday that Rudd is not yet the winner of the race.

“We may have a few days of confusion and we will have to wait and see what happens,” Colvin told AM.

Colvin was asked if he thought Rudd could win the campaign, and he replied, “No.

I’m sure he’ll win.”

He added that the Australian people are voting for a Prime Minister who will have the power to shape the nation.

“I believe they want a Prime Minster who will not have a big government and who is going to work for the country,” he said.

Colvin is not the only commentator to predict that the election could be decided by a one-party majority.

And, just hours before the election, former Labor leader Kevin Rudd was speaking at a Melbourne rally, and a lot of people were predicting that the former Prime Minister could win.

“We’re not even halfway through the campaign,” Rudd told supporters.

He said he is confident that he can win, and the only question is how far.

ABC election analyst Paul McKeown said he thinks the Prime Minister is not far off from victory.

“It’s a pretty clear split between Labor and the Greens and I think Rudd will win a fair bit of the support from that,” McKeon said.

“But I’m not quite sure what’s going to happen at the election.

I think there’s a lot more people looking at the polls than there are people voting.”

He said the outcome will depend on whether Rudd has enough support to convince the public to back him.

“That will depend quite a lot on how many people actually turn out in the early voting period,” he added.

“The last poll, Labor did very well in the mid to late-campaign period.”

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